David Hogsette

Educational Background

Ph.D., English Language and Literature, The Ohio State University

M.A., English Language and Literature, The Ohio State University

B.A., English Language and Literature, The Ohio State University

Biography

David received his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. in English language and literature from The Ohio State University. His areas of specialization are nineteenth-century English literature (the Romantic poets), fantasy literature, science fiction, pre-Civil War American literature, critical theory, composition, and teaching with technology.

From 2014-2020, he was professor of English at Grove City College, where he directed the Writing Program and the Writing Center. He also taught a number of writing courses (college composition, writing about literature, and technical writing) and various literature courses (both face-to-face and online), including civilization and literature, Romantic period literature, Gothic literature, science fiction, and fantasy literature. From 1996-2014, he was professor of English and Writing Program Coordinator at the New York Institute of Technology, Old Westbury campus.

David is keenly interested in global education. In addition to working and teaching at Wenzhou-Kean University, he has taught at two other universities in China and a seminary in South Korea. He believes in the necessity of global education, and he is thrilled to be afforded the opportunity to teach students from China and other parts of the world, encouraging them to contemplate what it means to be a human being in a global setting, striving for universal human flourishing.

He enjoys traveling, biking, kayaking, hiking, and playing electric guitar (rather badly). He has been training in Matsubayashi Shorin Ryu (a traditional Okinawan karate style) for over 25 years, and he studies and teaches the practical self-defense applications (bunkai) of karate techniques (kihon) and traditional forms (kata).

Research interests

David has published two books: Writing That Makes Sense: Critical Thinking in College Composition (now in a second edition), and E-mails to a Young Seeker: Exchanges in Mere Christianity. He is currently finishing his third book project, which is under contract with McFarland Press, titled Narnia, Middle-Earth and Beyond: The Transcendent Vision of Mythopoeic Fantasy.

He lectures and presents academic papers on various literary subjects, including Romantic poetry, Gothic novels, fantasy literature, and science fiction literature and film. He has published book chapters, articles, and reviews on 18th-19th century Romantic poetry, Gothic literature, and fantasy literature.

In 2019, David was invited by Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism to be the academic advisor for entries on fantasy authors, writing annotated bibliographies, summarizing trends in scholarship, and supervising the writing of biographical information. He has completed entries on Lord Dunsany and J. R. R. Tolkien, and in 2021 he will begin working on a new entry devoted to The Lord of the Rings.

Currently, he is revising and resubmitting an article to the science fiction journal Extrapolation titled “Replicant Adam and Eve Mythology and Postsecular Critique of Materialism in the Blade Runner Films.” He is also in the early stages of developing his next major research project focusing on the rise of science fiction in modern China, the foundation of which is a conference paper on Liu Cixin’s The Three-Body Problem to be delivered at the Rocky Mountain MLA conference in Fall 2021.

To learn more about his research projects and teaching, visit https://www.davidhogsette.com/

Selected Publications/scholarly and creative work

Books

Writing That Makes Sense: Critical Thinking in College Composition. 2nd ed. Eugene, OR: Resource Publications/Wipf and Stock, 2019.

E-mails to a Young Seeker: Exchanges in Mere Christianity. Eugene, OR: Wipf and Stock, 2011.

Academic Articles and Book Chapters

“J. R. R. Tolkien,” Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism, forthcoming in 2021.

“Lord Dunsany,” Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism, vol. 392, edited by Carol A. Schwartz. Farmington Hills, Gale, 2020, pp. 1-143.

“‘Swimming Against the Stream’: Rush’s Romantic Critique of Their Modern Age.” Rock and Romanticism: Blake, Wordsworth, and Rock from Dylan to U2, edited by James Rovira, Lexington Books, 2018, pp. 111-25.

“The Way of the Fantasist: Ethical Complexities in the Taoist Mythopoeic Fantasy of Ursula Le Guin’s A Wizard of Earthsea.” Teens and the New Religious Landscape: Essays on Contemporary Young Adult Fiction, edited by Jacob Stratman, McFarland, 2018, pp. 171-88.

“Metaphysical Intersections in Frankenstein: Mary Shelley’s Theistic Investigation of Scientific Materialism and Transgressive Autonomy.Christianity and Literature, vol. 60, no. 4, 2011, pp. 531-59.

“Controlling Women’s Voices in The Handmaid’s Tale.” Social Issues in Literature: Women’s Issues in Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid Tale, edited by David E. Nelson. Gale, 2011, pp. 98-112. (Republication as a book chapter of my article “Margaret Atwood’s Rhetorical Epilogue in The Handmaid’s Tale: The Reader’s Role in Empowering Offred’s Speech Act” solicited by the publisher.)

“Textual Surveillance, Social Codes, and Sublime Voices: The Tyranny of Narrative in Caleb Williams and Wieland.” Romanticism on the Net, vols. 38-39, May-August 2005.

“Coleridge as Victorian Heirloom: Nostalgic Rhetoric in the Early Victorian Reviews of Poetical Works.Studies in Romanticism, vol. 37, Spring 1998, pp. 63-75.

“Eclipsed by the Pleasure Dome: Poetic Failure in Coleridge’s ‘Kubla Khan.’” Romanticism on the Net, vol. 5, February 1997.

“Margaret Atwood’s Rhetorical Epilogue in The Handmaid’s Tale: The Reader’s Role in Empowering Offred’s Speech Act.” Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction, vol. 38, no. 4, 1997, pp. 262-78.

Conference Presentations

“Cultural Fluidity in Global Literary Pedagogy: Teaching Hamlet in China with The Banquet.” College English Association of Ohio Conference, Virtual Conference, April 2021.

“The Tyranny of Masculine Creation and the Potency of a Replicant Adam and Eve Mythology: Postsecular Critique of Materialism in the Blade Runner Films.” American Literature Association Conference, Boston, MA, May 2019.

“Domestic Affection and the Voice of Conscience in Frankenstein: Mary Shelley’s Corrective to William Godwin’s Moral Idealism.” Center of Vision and Values Conference, Grove City College, Grove City, PA, April 2019.

“Exploring Classical Thought and Culture in the East and the West: Teaching Hamlet and The Banquet in the Civilization and Literature Humanities Core.” Association for Core Texts and Courses International Conference, Concordia University, Irvine, CA, July 2018.

“That Hideous Progeny: Frankenstein and Mary Shelley’s Conversations with Science, Domesticity, and Romanticism.” A solicited, co-plenary address for the Conference on Christianity and Literature, Southeastern Region, Union University, Jackson, TN, April 2018.

“Mythopoeic Responses to the Great War: Escape, Recovery, and Consolation in the Postwar Fantasy of Lord Dunsany, J. R. R. Tolkien, and C. S. Lewis.” Center for Vision and Values Conference, Grove City College, Grove City, PA, April 2018.

“Escape, Grace, and the Logic of Belief: The Enduring Relevance of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe.” A solicited lecture as a visiting professor to the Independent Reformed Theological Academy, Seoul, South Korea, July 2017.

“Materialistic Dehumanization in Brave New World and A Clockwork Orange.” Center for Vision and Values Conference, Grove City College, Grove City, PA, April 2017.

“Loving the Exiled Vampire: The Limits of Eros and the Liberating Power of Virginal Masculine Agape in Angela Carter’s ‘The Lady in the House of Love.’” Conference on Christianity and Literature, East Region, Grove City College, Grove City, PA, March 2017.

“Myth and Metafiction in George MacDonald’s Phantastes: Mythopoeic Reading as Spiritual Sanctification.” Annual Conference of the C. S. Lewis and Inklings Society, John Brown University, Siloam Springs, AR, March 2016.

“Escape, Natural Law, and Providence in J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Fellowship of the Ring.” An invited lecture sponsored by Residence Life and the Center for Vision and Values, Grove City College, Grove City, PA, April 2015.

“The Centrality of the Tom Bombadil Episode in The Fellowship of the Ring: Lessons in Friendship, Community, and Grace.” Annual Conference of the C. S. Lewis and Inklings Society, Grove City, PA, March 2015.

Courses

ENG 2403: World Literature

ENG 3029: Research in Language and Literature